WALKING THE TALK OF YOUR CORPORATE BRAND

If you’ve ever watched the hilariously awkward TV classic, “The Office,” then you probably remember the smattering of ironic corporate values posters like the one above. A key lesson from the sitcom’s dysfunctional leaders is that values mean nothing unless you actually believe and uphold them. 

But what if there were a better way to define your values and to build an engaging workplace culture — where employees buy into, live out, and ultimately pay off your brand’s position and purpose in their day-to-day work?

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Matt Thornhill
WHY EVERY BUSINESS LEADER SHOULD CARE ABOUT D&I

These days, many conversations we hear about diversity and inclusion in the workplace suggest that some managers think D&I stands for “difficult” and “internalized.” Many such leaders and managers struggle to talk about race, gender, and other aspects of diversity. And some think D&I means they should favor one group over another.

When we hear this line of thinking, our SIR experts usually find an absence of an organization-wide plan to make D&I a fundamental business strategy.

And that’s a mistake.

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Matt Thornhill
WINNING WITH MILLENNIAL RECRUITS

Critical question for any employer today: Is at least a third of your workforce under age 35? 

If not, you risk losing out, and big time. Millennials make up 1 in 3 workers in the modern labor force today — and that number is only going to get bigger. By 2025, Millennials will be nearly half the U.S. workforce.

This is one curve you don’t want to fall behind. Not having a healthy mix of Millennials in your organization in 2017 could be a sign that your workplace culture is not aligned with modern culture overall. And the consequences of such a misalignment could be severe.

Let’s investigate.

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Matt Thornhill
Why Tomorrow's Top places Are Thinking Beyond Themselves

Here in SIR’s backyard of Richmond, Virginia, we often hear discussions about the need for more regional cooperation — between the local city government and the three surrounding counties (all separate jurisdictions).

But honestly, these discussions are decades out of date. After spending two days leading sessions at a the National League of Cities annual conference recently, we can confidently say that today, “super regions” are the latest thinking for effective, higher-order collaboration. Across the U.S., we’re seeing multiple cities, towns, and counties join together in these functional, symbiotic relationships that enable all areas to prosper — individually and together.

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Matt Thornhill